Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reports | IOS Press (2022)

Editorial Board

Editor-in-Chief

George Perry, PhD
College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio,
One UTSA Circle
San Antonio, Texas 78249
USA
Tel.: +1 210 458 4450
Fax: +1 210 458 4445
Email: george.perry@utsa.edu
ORCID: 0000-0002-6547-0172

Managing Editor

Beth Kumar
Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University
2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio 44106
USA
Tel.: +1 216 502 2019
Email: jadreports@iospress.com

Associate Editors

J. Wesson Ashford, MD, PhD
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA
USA
(aging, screening, dementia assessment, dementia diagnosis, apolipoprotein E)

Craig S. Atwood, PhD
Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI
USA
(amyloid biology, cell cycle control, endocrinology, neurodegeneration, neurodevelopment, neuroendocrinology, neuroregeneration)

Jesús Ávila, MD
Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Madrid
Spain
(tau protein, aging, neuron reprogramming)

Rudy J. Castellani, MD
Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
USA
(frontotemporal lobar degeneration, traumatic brain injury, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, prion disease, neuropathology)

Sergio T. Ferreira, PhD
Institute of Biophysics & Institute of Medical Biochemistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil
(Aβ oligomers, neurotransmitters, mRNA translation, protein synthesis, synaptic dysfunction)

Robert Friedland, MD
Department of Neurology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
USA
(Parkinson's disease, microbiota, cognitive neurology, bacterial amyloid)

DanielaGalimberti, PhD
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences University of Milan, Milan;
Neurodegenerative Diseases Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda, Ospedale Policlinico, Milan
Italy
(frontotemporal dementia, genetics, molecular biology, inflammation)

Alan Lerner, MD
Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH
USA
(dementia, cognitive testing, dementia medications, verbal fluency, brain health)

Ricardo Maccioni, PhD
Laboratory of Neurosciences and Functional Medicine, International Center for Biomedicine, Santiago
Chile
(neurodegeneration, tau protein, biomarkers for AD, nutraceutical compounds, multitarget therapy)

Patrizia Mecocci, MD, PhD
Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, Perugia
Italy
(brain aging, dementia, cognitive impairment, frailty, biomarker)

Paula Moreira, PhD
Faculty of Medicine & Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra
Portugal
(diabetes, metabolic hormones, mitochondria, preclinical studies, redox status)

Akihiko Nunomura, MD, PhD
Department of Psychiatry, Jikei University School of Medicine
Japan
(brain aging, dementia, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, RNA)

Giulio Maria Pasinetti, MD, PhD
Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
USA
(Inflammasome, Microbiome, Microbiota, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Neuroinflammation)

Marwan N. Sabbagh, MD, FAAN
Alzheimer's and Memory Disorders Division, Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ
USA
(Lewy body dementia, clinical trials, drug development, therapeutics, biomarkers)

Thomas B. Shea, PhD
Department of Biological Sciences, UMass Lowell, Lowell, MA
USA
(Nutraceuticals, neuronal culture, mouse models, clinical investigations)

Gwenn Smith, PhD
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
USA
(Neuroimaging, dementia, depression, serotonin)

Massimo Tabaton, MD
Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties (DIMI), Unit of Geriatric Medicine, University of Genova, Genova
Italy
(amyloid-beta, APP processing, beta-secretase, markers: FTD, mild cognitive impairment)

Xiongwei Zhu, PhD
Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
USA
(mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, cell death, signal transduction)

Author Guidelines

SUBMISSION OF MANUSCRIPT

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR MANUSCRIPTHERE

SUBMISSION POLICY

By submitting my article to this journal, I agree to theAuthor Copyright Agreement, theIOS Press Ethics Policy, and theIOS Press Privacy Policy.

Note that only papers accepted for publication are subject to payment of an article processing charge of US$1450 / EUR1250 to publish under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 license, or optionally US$2080 / EUR1850 to publish under the CC-BY 4.0 license. (There are no article submission charges for this journal.) The policy for waivers can be found below under the header "Open Access Fee Waivers". Paid fees will not be restituted if articles are withdrawn or need to be retracted after acceptance.

Submission of an article is understood to imply that the article is original and unpublished and is not being considered for publication elsewhere. Any possible conflict of interest, financial or otherwise, related to the submitted work must be clearly indicated in the manuscript. On submission the author(s) will be asked to provide an ORCID if available (optional) for verification purposes.

The article type (Research Report, Review, Short Communication, Hypothesis, etc.) should be clearly mentioned in the cover letter to help the editorial process.

This journal operates with single-blind peer review. If the author prefers double-blind peer review, then please submit your manuscript excluding the author listing and make sure your document is anonymized, and list your authors and affiliations only in the cover letter for the Editor. Each paper is evaluated by at least two peer reviewers and the Editor-in-Chief.

Note that the manuscript should be uploaded as one file with tables and figures included. This file can be a Word document, a PDF, or an embedded compressed file (.zip, .rar) if separate high resolution figures or a supplemental file such as a video are also to be included with the submission (the file size maximum for a video is 25 MB).If the video is too large to submit, please contactjadreports@iospress.comto arrange a file transfer. For more information about submitting supplementary data see “Supplementary Material.”

Resubmissions should include the manuscript number in the cover letter. The author's replies to the reviewer comments should be included within the revised manuscript itself (at the top). The revised paper should always be a Word document.

ETHICS POLICIES AND PATIENT PERMISSIONS

Procedures involving experiments on human subjects should be in accord with the ethical standards of the Committee on Human Experimentation of the institution in which the experiments were done or in accord with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975. The author must state compliance in the cover letter and in the Methods section of the article.

Procedures involving experimentation on animal subjects should be in accord with either the guide of the institution in which the experiments were done, or with the National Research Council’s guide for the care and use of laboratory animals. The author must state compliance in the cover letter and in the Methods section of the article.

Preferably patients in figures should be unrecognizable. Authors are responsible for obtaining patient permission for use of the material from all recognizable participants in photographs, videos, or other information that may be published in the Journal or on the journal’s website. A statement that permission was granted by the patient must accompany the figure legend. Do not use study participants' names, initials, or hospital numbers anywhere in the manuscript (including figures).

PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPTS

Research Reports

Organization and style of presentation

  1. Manuscripts must be written in English. Authors whose native language is not English are advised to consult a professional English language editing service or a native English speaker prior to submission.
  2. Nomenclature for amyloids should follow the 2018 guidelines of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) nomenclature committee (Amyloid25, 215-219, 2018), e.g., amyloid-β (Aβ) and amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP). Also preferred is Aβ42and sAβPPα.
  3. Manuscripts should be double spaced throughout with wide margins (2.5 cm or 1 in), including the abstract and references. Every page of the manuscript, including the title page, references, tables, etc., should include a page number centered at the bottom. Do not number headings or subheadings (use all caps, italics, then underline). Footnotes should be avoided.
  4. There are no page or word limits for Research Reports but manuscripts over 10,000 words (Introduction through Discussion) should be approved by the Editor-in-Chief before submission.
  5. Manuscripts should be organized in the following order with headings and subheadings typed on a separate line, without indentation.

Title page
- Title (should be clear, descriptive and concise)
- Full name(s) of author(s)
- Full affiliation(s). Delineate affiliations with lowercase letters.
- Present address of author(s), if different from affiliation
- Running title (45 characters or less, including spaces)
- Complete correspondence address, including telephone number, fax number and e-mail address

Leave the author information blank if double-blind peer review is wished for and anonymize your document, but do include the information in the cover letter.

If any author is also a member of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports Editorial Board, this should be declared in the Conflict of Interest Section (see instructions in the section for Conflict of Interest).

Changes in Authorship

(Video) "The Journey of JAD," by George Perry, PhD

When submitting the manuscript the author listing and order should be final. If any addition, deletion or rearrangement of author names in the authorship list does need to be made after submission, this can be done only before acceptance and with the Editor’s approval. To request such a change, the Editor must receive the following from the corresponding author: (1) the reason for the change in author list and (2) written confirmation from all authors, including the affected author, that they agree with the addition, removal or rearrangement.

Only in exceptional circumstances will the Editor consider the addition, deletion or rearrangement of authors after the manuscript has been accepted. While the Editor considers the request, publication of the manuscript will be suspended. If the manuscript has already been published in an issue, any requests approved by the Editor will result in an Erratum.

Abstract and Keywords

-The abstract for research papers should follow the "structured abstract" format:
BACKGROUND:
OBJECTIVE:
METHODS:
RESULTS:
CONCLUSIONS:
The abstract should try to be no longer than 250 words.
- For other papers such as Reviews, the abstract should be clear, descriptive, and self-explanatory, and no longer than 250 words.

- Include a list of 4-10 keywords. These keywords should be terms from the MeSH database.

- Note that ALL articles must include an abstract.

Introduction

Materials and Methods
If applicable to the study, Ethics statements and/or patient permissions must be included in the Materials and Methods section (see top of this page “ETHICS POLICIES AND PATIENT PERMISSIONS”

Results

Discussion

Acknowledgments
If there are no acknowledgments, then do still include this section and insert: “The authors have no acknowledgments to report.”

Funding
If there is no funding involved, then do still include this section and insert: “The authors have no funding to report.”

Conflict of Interest
If there is no conflict of interest to declare, do still include this section and insert "The authors have no conflict of interest to report". If an author is also on the Editorial Board of this journal, the following statement should be included in this section: “<AUTHOR> is an Editorial Board member of this journal,but was not involved in the peer-review process nor had access to any information regarding its peer review.’’

References
(Download the EndNote style (the same as for Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease) from EndNote (https://endnote.com/style_download/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/). A .csl file is availablehere.

  1. Place citations as numbers in square brackets in the text in order of appearance (inside/before punctuation). Each citation should be to one manuscript only. All publications cited in the text should be presented in a list of references following the text of the manuscript. Only articles published or accepted for publication should be listed in the reference list. Submitted articles can be listed in the text as (Author(s), unpublished data).
  2. All authors should be listed in the reference list.
  3. Please include DOI numbers for "in press" articles if available.
  4. Carefully check for and remove any duplicates (especially when using reference software).
  5. References should be listed in the order of appearance in the following style:

[1] Alzheimer Research Forum, Drugs in Clinical Trials: AAB-001,http://www.alzforum.org/drg/drc/detail.asp?id=101, Last updated May 29, 2007, Accessed on January 29, 2008.
[2] Smith MA (2006) Oxidative stress and iron imbalance in Alzheimer disease: how rust became the fuss! InAlzheimer's Disease: A Century of Scientific and Clinical Research, Perry G, Avila J, Kinoshita J, Smith MA, eds. IOS Press, Amsterdam, pp. 305-308.
[3] Hara H, Monsonego A, Yuasa K, Adachi K, Xiao X, Takeda S, Takahashi K, Weiner HL, Tabira T (2004) Development of a safe oral Abeta vaccine using recombinant adeno-associated virus vector for Alzheimer's disease.J Alzheimers Dis6, 483-488.
[4] Paxinos G, Watson C (1986)The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates, Academic Press, Sydney.
[5] Zhu X, Perry G, Smith MA (2004) Two hits and you're out? A novel mechanistic hypothesis of Alzheimer disease,Alzheimer Research Forum,http://www.alzforum.org/res/adh/cur/zhu/default.asp, Posted 23 October 2004, Accessed 29 January 2008.

If you are using EndNote and the journal names are not properly abbreviating, please try updating your Journals Term List (https://community.endnote.com/t5/EndNote-How-To/Problems-with-Journal-name-abbreviations/td-p/3003).

Datasets and Data Articles
All datasets and data articles referenced in your manuscript should be cited in the main reference list of your article (not in a separate box or in the article text).

Tables
- Number according to their sequence in the text. The text should include references to all tables.
- Provide each table on a separate page of the manuscript after the references.
- Include a brief and self-explanatory title with any explanations essential to the understanding of the table given in footnotes at the bottom of the table.
- Vertical lines should not be used to separate columns. Leave some extra space between the columns instead.

- Citations in the tables should be numbered and included in the Reference list.

Figure Legends
The author is required to have obtained patient permission from all recognizable participants in photographs, videos, or other information that may be published in the Journal or on the journal’s website. A statement that permission was granted by the patient must accompany the figure legend. Do not use study participants' names, initials, or hospital numbers in the legend, figure, or anywhere in the manuscript.

Figures
- Number the figures according to their sequence in the text. The text should include references to all figures.
- Figures should preferably be formatted in TIF or EPS format. JPG is also acceptable.
- Figures should be designed with the format of Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports in mind and preferable sized as they will appear in the PDF. A single column of the journal is 77mm and two columns are 165mm.
- Figures should be at 300 dpi or higher and be cropped to include the figure only (no blank space). CMYK is preferred for color figures.
- On figures where a scale is needed, use bar scales to avoid problems if the figure needs to be reduced.
- Each illustration should have a brief self-explanatory legend that should be typed separately from the figure in the section of the manuscript following the tables.
- Color figures are free in the electronic version of the journal (this journal is not printed).

Image Integrity
Images submitted with a manuscript for review should be minimally processed. No specific feature within an image may be enhanced, obscured, moved, removed, or introduced. The grouping or consolidation of images from multiple sources must be made explicit by the arrangement of the figure and in the figure legend. Adjustments of brightness, contrast, or color balance are acceptable if they are applied to the whole image and if they do not obscure, eliminate, or misrepresent any information present in the original, including backgrounds.

Unprocessed data files may be requested to help in manuscript evaluation during the peer review process or may be needed to respond to post-publication issues that may arise with published papers.

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Unprocessed data and metadata files should be retained, ideally forever.

Unprocessed original images of gels and western blots must be included with submissions as Supplementary Material for reviewers to examine (not for publication). This must include the full blots, not cropped sections.

Supplementary Material
Supplementary material is peer-reviewed material directly relevant to the conclusion of a paper that cannot be included in the PDF for reasons of space or medium (for example, large excel tables, movie clips or sound files). The supplement will be available for download from the publisher's content library site at the time of publication and will be made available in the format in which it was provided.

Supplementary material should be included at the end of the main manuscript at the time of submission. In the case of sound/movie files, these can be submitted separately to the Managing Editor (jadreports@iospress.com) at the time of submission. Supplementary tables and figures must have a separate numbering system from that used for tables and figures that appear in the main paper (the first figure displayed should be labeled "Supplementary Figure 1", the first table "Supplementary Table 1", and so on). References should also be cited in supplements started with [1] and listed separately.

Supplementary files are limited to 10 MB, except videos which can be up to 25 MB.

Supplementary material for Short Communications is limited to 500 words and 1 table or figure.

Review Articles
Review Articles should be authoritative and topical and provide comprehensive and balanced coverage of a timely and/or controversial issue. Review Articles should be prepared as detailed above for a Research Report, omitting Introduction through Discussion, and include a conclusion. An abstract must also be included. The length of the Review Article is at the discretion of the author but should be within reasonable limits. The Editor-in-Chief can be consulted regarding reviews of unusual length (>10,000 words).

Systematic reviews or meta-analyses that include a methods section are typically considered as a Research report and should be formatted as such.

Short Communications
A short communication is an article of original scholarship of unusual interest of less than 2000 words (Introduction through Discussion). An abstract of 100 words or less should be included with no subdivison of text into sections. References should be formatted as above. A total of three tables and/or figures are allowed.

Hypotheses
A hypothesis article should be a balanced and insightful consideration of a topic with novel hypotheses well presented and supported. The article should be prepared as a Research Report but without Methods or Results sections.

Commentaries
Commentaries can be around 1000 words with an abstract and no other subdivisions.

REMEMBER TO INCLUDE

In cover letter:
-
Name, postal address, phone number, fax number and e-mail address of the corresponding author.
- Name of an Associate Editorwith expertise in the area of the study (if no Associate Editor is suitable, the Editorial Office will handle the submission).
- Statement that all authors have contributed to the work, agree with the presented findings, and that the work has not been published before nor is being considered for publication in another journal.
- A list of at least 4-6 potential reviewers knowledgeable in the area of the study and potential reviewer conflicts.
- Statement that procedures involving experiments on human subjects are done in accord with the ethical standards of the Committee on Human Experimentation of the institution in which the experiments were done or in accord with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975.
- Statement that procedures involving experimentation on animal subjects are done in accord with either the guide of the institution in which the experiments were done, or with the National Research Council's guide for the care and use of laboratory animals.

In manuscript:
-
Compliance with guidelines on human experimentation as well as protocol approval by a local Institutional Review Board should be specified.
- Compliance with guidelines of animal experimentation as well as protocol approval by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee should be specified.
- Statement of all financial and material support for this research and any potential conflicts should also be clearly identified in thethe acknowledgment and Conflict of Interest sections. If there is no Conflict-of-Interest then still add this statement.

Resubmissions
Resubmissions should include the manuscript number and a reference that the paper is a revision. The point-by-point response to the previous reviews should be included at the top of the manuscript. Please submit a tracked version of the paper so editors and reviewers can easily find the changes, or otherwise highlight the edited sections by color or by another detectable way.

Financial Disclosure
All affiliations with or financial involvement (e.g., employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, royalties) with any organization or entity with a financial interest in or in financial competition with the subject matter or materials discussed in the manuscript are completely disclosed in the letter of submission.

All financial and material support for this research and work are clearly identified in the manuscript including listing of support specified in the letter of submission that might constitute or give the appearance of influencing the findings, based on the judgment of the Editor-in-Chief in consultation with the Associate Editor handling the review of the manuscript.

PRE-PRESS AND PROOFS

Accepted articles will be placed online as "pre-press" articles two weeks after acceptance. The corresponding author will receive the PDF proof around the same time, and is asked to check this proof carefully (the publisher will execute a cursory check only). Corrections other than typesetter's errors should be avoided. Costs arising from excessive corrections will be charged to the authors. The pre-press file will remain as the uncorrected proof version until the article is published in an issue and the final published version replaces the pre-press file.

The corresponding author will receive a pdf proof and is asked to check this proof carefully (the publisher will execute a cursory check only). Corrections other than printer's errors, however, should be avoided. Costs arising from such corrections will be charged to the authors.

OPEN ACCESS

TheJournal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports is a fully open access journal. More information about open access publishing in IOS Press journals can be found here: IOS Press Open Library.

Policy regarding the NIH Public Access Policy mandate (PubMed Central)
All articles published in Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports are automatically transferred to Pubmed Central by the publisher within 1 month from the final publication date.

(Video) Alzheimer's Disease 2021: Hot Topics in Disease Prevention and Clinical Trials

Open Access Fee Waivers

A waiver request for the required publication fee should be submitted before the initial submission of a paper. Please send your title, abstract, keyword list and author listing including affiliations (and if available ORCID IDs), to the Editor-in-Chief, George Perry (george.perry@utsa.edu) with a cc to the editorial office (jadreports@iospress.com), along with your motivation for the waiver. Your request will be evaluated. Waivers are available for corresponding authors from low-income countries as identified by the Hinari Project.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright of your article
Authors submitting a manuscript do so on the understanding that they have read and agreed to the terms of theIOS Press Author Copyright Agreement.

Article sharing
Authors of journal articles are permitted to self-archive and share their work through institutional repositories, personal websites, and preprint servers. Authors have the right to use excerpts of their article in other works written by the authors themselves, provided that the original work is properly cited. The consent for sharing an article, in whole or in part, depends on the version of the article that is shared, where it is shared, and thecopyright licenseunder which the article is published. Please refer to theIOS Press Article Sharing Policyfor further information.

Quoting from other publications
Authors, when quoting from someone else's work or when considering reproducing figures or tables from a book or journal article, should make sure that they are not infringing a copyright. Although in general authors may quote from other published works, permission should be obtained from the holder of the copyright if there will be substantial extracts or reproduction of tables, plates, or other figures. If the copyright holder is not the author of the quoted or reproduced material, it is recommended that the permission of the author should also be sought. Material in unpublished letters and manuscripts is also protected and must not be published unless permission has been obtained. Submission of a paper will be interpreted as a statement that the author has obtained all the necessary permission. A suitable acknowledgement of any borrowed material must always be made.

COMPLIMENTARY COPY AND PURCHASE

Complimentary copy
The corresponding author of a contribution to this journal will receive a PDF copy of their published article on release.

An author is entitled to 25% discount on IOS Press books. See Author's Discount (25%) on all IOS Press book publications.

HOW TO PROMOTE YOUR WORK

Would you like some pointers on how to help your research achieve a wider reach and greater impact? Please consult ourPromotional Toolkit for Authorsfor tips.

Please visit theIOS Press Authors pagefor further information.

(Video) About the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, by George Perry, JAD Editor in Chief recorded 2020

Abstracted/Indexed in

Embase
Google Scholar
Pubmed Central
Scopus
Web of Science: Emerging Sources Citation Index

Peer Review Policy

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports adheres to the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) code of conduct for editors and reviewers (publicationethics.org/resources/guidelines-new/cope-ethical-guidelines-peer-reviewers). Our guidelines should be read in conjunction with this broader guidance. All studies must be conducted to a high ethical standard and must adhere to local regulations and standards for gaining scrutiny and approval.Please visit ourreviewer guidelinesfor further information about how to conduct a review.

Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports operates a rigorous, timely, single-blinded peer review process (double-blind on request). After automatic plagiarism screening through iThenticate, manuscripts submitted to the journal will be assessed for suitability for publication in the journal by the Editor-in-Chief or an assigned Associate Editor. Manuscripts that are deemed unsuitable may be rejected without peer review. Manuscripts that are deemed suitable for peer review are sent to appropriate anonymous referees (a minimum of two) for confidential review. Referee reports are then assessed by the handling Editor, who will send a decision letter to the author along with the anonymized referee reports. All decision letters are approved by the Editor-in-Chief.

The initial decision will be one of the following: rejection, acceptance without revision, or potentially acceptable after minor or major revisions. Revised manuscripts will then be appraised by the Editor-in-Chief or handling Editor, who may seek the opinion of referees (prior or new) before making a final decision. Once approved this decision is then conveyed to the author along with the referee reports. Once accepted manuscripts are published online in the current Volume's run-on content.

The Editor-in-Chief has ultimate responsibility for what is published in the journal. Authors may appeal decisions by contacting the Editor-in-Chief (atjadreports@iospress.com). Authors will be informed in writing of the result of their appeal.

FAQs

What are the 5 A's of Alzheimer's disease? ›

The risk of Alzheimer's increases with age and is most common in people over 65. The symptoms of Alzheimer's are commonly referred to as the 5 A's of Alzheimer's which include: Amnesia, Apraxia, Agnosia, Aphasia, and Anomia. Often the most recognized symptom, which refers to memory loss.

What are the 4 A's of Alzheimer's symptoms? ›

The four A's of Alzheimer's disease are: amnesia, aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia. Amnesia. Amnesia, the most common sign of Alzheimer's disease, refers to loss of memory.

Are potatoes good for Alzheimer's? ›

Summary: A virus that commonly infects potatoes bears a striking resemblance to one of the key proteins implicated in Alzheimer's disease, and researchers have used that to develop antibodies that may slow or prevent the onset of AD.

Is journal of Alzheimer's disease peer-reviewed? ›

Alzheimer's & Dementia®: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, is the leading peer-reviewed, monthly journal in Alzheimer's and dementia.

What 7 things trigger Alzheimer's? ›

A study published in The Lancet Neurology shows that healthy living can help reduce the risk of Alzheimer's.
...
Keep clicking to see the top 7 risk factors for Alzheimer's disease...
  • Diabetes. istockphoto. ...
  • Low education (TIE) ...
  • Obesity (TIE) ...
  • High blood pressure. ...
  • Smoking. ...
  • Depression. ...
  • Too little exercise.
19 Jul 2011

Does alcohol make Alzheimer's worse? ›

Alcohol consumption in excess has well-documented negative effects on both short- and long-term health, one of which is brain damage that can lead to Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia.

How does peanut butter detect Alzheimer's? ›

The peanut butter test is a diagnostic test which aims to detect Alzheimer's disease by measuring subjects' ability to smell peanut butter through each nostril.

How do eyes show early signs of Alzheimer's? ›

Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships. For some people, having vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer's. This may lead to difficulty with balance or trouble reading. They may also have problems judging distance and determining color or contrast, causing issues with driving.

What is the most common early symptom of Alzheimer's? ›

Memory problems are typically one of the first signs of cognitive impairment related to Alzheimer's disease. Decline in non-memory aspects of cognition, such as word-finding, vision/spatial issues, and impaired reasoning or judgment, may also signal the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

What snack fixes Alzheimer's? ›

Some of the best snacks for people with Alzheimer's are hard-boiled eggs, berries, nuts, and sliced vegetables.

What are the 3 foods that fight memory loss? ›

What are the foods that fight memory loss? Berries, fish, and leafy green vegetables are 3 of the best foods that fight memory loss. There's a mountain of evidence showing they support and protect brain health.

Is Alz org a credible source? ›

The Alzheimer's Association is the trusted resource for reliable information, education, referral and support to millions of people affected by the disease.

What is a good impact factor? ›

In most fields, the impact factor of 10 or greater is considered an excellent score while 3 is flagged as good and the average score is less than 1.

Whats is the difference between Alzheimer's and dementia? ›

While dementia is a general term, Alzheimer's disease is a specific brain disease. It is marked by symptoms of dementia that gradually get worse over time. Alzheimer's disease first affects the part of the brain associated with learning, so early symptoms often include changes in memory, thinking and reasoning skills.

Who is most likely to inherit Alzheimer's? ›

Family history

Those who have a parent, brother or sister with Alzheimer's are more likely to develop the disease. The risk increases if more than one family member has the illness. When diseases tend to run in families, either heredity (genetics), environmental factors, or both, may play a role.

Does caffeine affect Alzheimer's? ›

A long-term, low dose of caffeine worsened neophobia (fear of everything new), anxiety-related behaviors, and emotional and cognitive flexibility — while providing only little benefit to learning and memory.

Who is prone to Alzheimer's? ›

Age is the biggest risk factor for Alzheimer's. It mainly affects people over 65. Above this age, a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease doubles about every five years. One in six people over 80 have dementia – many of them have Alzheimer's disease.

Is Alzheimer's hereditary? ›

Is Alzheimer's Genetic? Family history is not necessary for an individual to develop Alzheimer's. However, research shows that those who have a parent or sibling with Alzheimer's are more likely to develop the disease than those who do not have a first-degree relative with Alzheimer's.

Does Alzheimer's affect sleep? ›

Alzheimer's disease often affects a person's sleeping habits. It may be hard to get the person to go to bed and stay there. Someone with Alzheimer's may sleep a lot or not enough, and may wake up many times during the night.

Can Alzheimer's patients drink wine? ›

Excessive wine consumption, associated with adverse brain outcomes, increases the risk of dementia by direct neurotoxic effects; however, light to moderate wine consumption seems to reduce the risk of dementia and cognitive decline in an age-dependent manner.

What is the Alzheimer's smell test? ›

The researchers asked each person to close their eyes, their mouth and one nostril. They opened a small container of peanut butter and moved progressively closer until the person could smell it. After measuring that distance, they waited 90 seconds and repeated the process with the other nostril.

Is napping associated with Alzheimer's? ›

CLEVELAND – A recent study has found that older adults who regularly nap for more than an hour a day had a 40% higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

What are the five safety smells that are lost with dementia? ›

Losing the ability to smell peppermint, fish, orange, rose and leather could be an accurate early warning sign of dementia, according to a new study. The ability of nearly 3,000 people aged 57 to 85 to detect these five odours was tested by scientists.

What is one of the first signs of cognitive decline? ›

Forgetting appointments and dates. Forgetting recent conversations and events. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by making decisions and plans. Having a hard time understanding directions or instructions.

Can an eye doctor tell if you have dementia? ›

According to a study published in Ophthalmology Retina (2019) conducted by the Duke Eye Center, a new, non-invasive imaging technology can detect indicators of Alzheimer's disease in a matter of seconds. The researchers discovered that in Alzheimer's patients, the tiny blood vessels in the retina change in appearance.

Do Alzheimer's patients eyes look different? ›

Many people with Alzheimer's disease have visual problems, such as changes in color vision, and past studies have shown retinal and other changes in their eyes.

How do you slow down Alzheimer's? ›

How to reduce your risk of Alzheimer's and other dementias
  1. Physical activity.
  2. Eating healthily.
  3. Don't smoke.
  4. Drink less alcohol.
  5. Stay mentally and socially active.
  6. Take control of your health.

Does a person with Alzheimer's know they have it? ›

Alzheimer's disease progressively destroys brain cells over time, so during the early stages of dementia, many do recognize something is wrong, but not everyone is aware. They may know they are supposed to recognize you, but they can't.

What is the most common cause of death in dementia patients? ›

One of the most common causes of death for people with dementia is pneumonia caused by an infection. A person in the later stages of dementia may have symptoms that suggest that they are close to death, but can sometimes live with these symptoms for many months.

Do bananas help with Alzheimer's? ›

Additional consumption of fresh fruits such as apple, banana, and orange may be beneficial to improve effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.”

Is ice cream good for dementia? ›

Ice cream brings people with dementia to happier, warmer times when the treat was shared with friends and loved ones at special, joyous occa- sions. Ice cream has the power to immediately elicit soothing feelings at the very first taste of a single spoon-full.

Can cutting out sugar reverse dementia? ›

Eating sugar and refined carbs can cause pre-dementia and dementia. But cutting out the sugar and refined carbs and adding lots of fat can prevent, and even reverse, pre-dementia and early dementia. More recent studies show people with diabetes have a four-fold risk for developing Alzheimer's.

Can vitamin D reverse dementia? ›

Overall, three studies found that vitamin D supplementation did not improve either cognitive outcomes (67,68,70) or reduce the risk of dementia/MCI compared to controls (70).

What drink improves memory? ›

Green tea

As is the case with coffee, the caffeine in green tea boosts brain function. In fact, it has been found to improve alertness, performance, memory, and focus ( 75 ). But green tea also has other components that make it a brain-healthy beverage.

What foods trigger dementia? ›

Many foods in the Western diet have been identified as risk factors for dementia and Alzheimer's, including red and processed meats, refined grains, sweets, and desserts. Excess alcohol intake, saturated fatty acids, and foods with a high number of calories are also risk factors for Alzheimer's.

What should you not do with Alzheimer's? ›

Here are our top 10 "don'ts" when it comes to interacting with someone who has Alzheimer's disease:
  • Don't Ignore Them.
  • Don't Talk to Them Like They're a Young Child or a Baby.
  • Don't Use Terms of Endearment Instead of Names.
  • Don't Assume They're Confused All the Time.
  • Don't Quiz Them.
10 Feb 2020

Should dementia patients watch TV? ›

For men and women with Alzheimer's disease or other forms of dementia, it can be especially beneficial. Watching movies and TV shows can help keep their brain active, which can stimulate positive memories, improve mood, and even increase socialization.

What nuts are good for Alzheimer's? ›

Early intervention with a diet rich in walnuts may help maintain cognitive function and delay onset and progression of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

How long can an 80 year old live with dementia? ›

Life expectancy is less if the person is diagnosed in their 80s or 90s. A few people with Alzheimer's live for longer, sometimes for 15 or even 20 years. Vascular dementia – around five years.

What are the 4 A's of Alzheimer's symptoms? ›

The four A's of Alzheimer's disease are: amnesia, aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia. Amnesia. Amnesia, the most common sign of Alzheimer's disease, refers to loss of memory.

What percentage of donation goes to Alzheimer's? ›

The national Alzheimer's Association organization continues to meet and exceed these minimum standards with 79% of our total annual expenses going to care, support, research, awareness and advocacy activities.

What is a Tier 1 journal? ›

Tier 1. High category (3.5-4) Peer-reviewed publications in one of the following: • Journal with Impact factor that falls in the top 25 percentile ranking based on the impact. factor within the subject, discipline, or sub-disciplinary category (refer to APPENDIX.

What is a Q1 journal? ›

Each subject category of journals is divided into four quartiles: Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4. Q1 is occupied by the top 25% of journals in the list; Q2 is occupied by journals in the 25 to 50% group; Q3 is occupied by journals in the 50 to 75% group and Q4 is occupied by journals in the 75 to 100% group.

What journal has the highest impact factor? ›

List of Top 100 Journals with Highest Impact Factor
RankJournal PublicationJournal Home page
1.Nature – Impact Factor: 42.78View
2.The New England Journal of Medicine – Impact Factor: 74.7View
3.Science – Impact Factor: 41.84View
4.IEEE/CVF Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition – Impact Factor: 45.17View
96 more rows

Why is Alzheimer's worse at night? ›

An upset in the "internal body clock," causing a biological mix-up between day and night. Reduced lighting can increase shadows and may cause the person living with the disease to misinterpret what they see and, subsequently, become more agitated.

How long does someone with Alzheimer's live? ›

The rate of progression for Alzheimer's disease varies widely. On average, people with Alzheimer's disease live between three and 11 years after diagnosis, but some survive 20 years or more. The degree of impairment at diagnosis can affect life expectancy.

How fast does Alzheimer's progress? ›

The progression rate for Alzheimer's disease can vary widely. According to the Mayo Clinic, people who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease average between three and 11 years after diagnosis.

What is the biggest difference between Alzheimer's and dementia? ›

While dementia is a general term, Alzheimer's disease is a specific brain disease. It is marked by symptoms of dementia that gradually get worse over time. Alzheimer's disease first affects the part of the brain associated with learning, so early symptoms often include changes in memory, thinking and reasoning skills.

What are the steps of Alzheimer's disease? ›

There are five stages associated with Alzheimer's disease: preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease and severe dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

Do Alzheimer patients know they have it? ›

Alzheimer's disease progressively destroys brain cells over time, so during the early stages of dementia, many do recognize something is wrong, but not everyone is aware. They may know they are supposed to recognize you, but they can't.

At what age is Alzheimer's considered early-onset? ›

Damage occurring in the brain of someone with Alzheimer's disease begins to show itself in very early clinical signs and symptoms. For most people with Alzheimer's—those who have the late-onset variety—symptoms first appear in their mid-60s. Signs of early-onset Alzheimer's begin between a person's 30s and mid-60s.

Is Alzheimer's hereditary? ›

Is Alzheimer's Genetic? Family history is not necessary for an individual to develop Alzheimer's. However, research shows that those who have a parent or sibling with Alzheimer's are more likely to develop the disease than those who do not have a first-degree relative with Alzheimer's.

What can prevent Alzheimer's? ›

Prevention Alzheimer's disease
  • stopping smoking.
  • keeping alcohol to a minimum.
  • eating a healthy, balanced diet, including at least 5 portions of fruit and vegetables every day.

Does dementia run in families? ›

Many people affected by dementia are concerned that they may inherit or pass on dementia. The majority of dementia is not inherited by children and grandchildren. In rarer types of dementia there may be a strong genetic link, but these are only a tiny proportion of overall cases of dementia.

What stage of Alzheimer's is loss of bowel control? ›

A: Inevitably in the final stage of Alzheimer's, a person will experience a loss of control over their movements, including their bowel and bladder muscles.

Why do Alzheimer's patients stop eating? ›

It may seem that the person is being starved or dehydrated to death, but they are not. In the end stages of dementia (in the last few months or weeks of life), the person's food and fluid intake tends to decrease slowly over time. The body adjusts to this slowing down process and the reduced intake.

How long does a person with Alzheimer's live? ›

On average, a person with Alzheimer's lives four to eight years after diagnosis, but can live as long as 20 years, depending on other factors. Changes in the brain related to Alzheimer's begin years before any signs of the disease.

What is the most common cause of death in dementia patients? ›

One of the most common causes of death for people with dementia is pneumonia caused by an infection. A person in the later stages of dementia may have symptoms that suggest that they are close to death, but can sometimes live with these symptoms for many months.

Should you tell Alzheimer patients the truth? ›

You must also learn how to handle the day-to-day challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer's disease. Most experts say that if the affected person asks you what's wrong with them, you should be honest. Knowing that the problem is a disease, not "insanity," is often a relief for the person affected.

Can someone with Alzheimer's get better? ›

There's currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease. But there is medicine available that can temporarily reduce the symptoms. Support is also available to help someone with the condition, and their family, cope with everyday life.

How do eyes show early signs of Alzheimer's? ›

Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships. For some people, having vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer's. This may lead to difficulty with balance or trouble reading. They may also have problems judging distance and determining color or contrast, causing issues with driving.

Can stress cause Alzheimer's? ›

The Vicious Cycle of Stress.

On the right arc of the cycle, elevated stress exacerbates Alzheimer's Disease, causing more rapid development of pathology and loss in cognitive function.

What is one of the first signs of cognitive decline? ›

Forgetting appointments and dates. Forgetting recent conversations and events. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by making decisions and plans. Having a hard time understanding directions or instructions.

Videos

1. UniProt and Alzheimer's Disease Linking molecular defects to disease phenotype
(European Bioinformatics Institute - EMBL-EBI)
2. Infectious Etiology of Alzheimer's Disease Workshop - Day 1
(National Institute on Aging)
3. Webinar on Clinical Meaningfulness in Alzheimer's Disease
(Alliance for Aging Research)
4. Alzheimer's Disease and Related Dementias Task Force Experience Committee Meeting
(OhioDeptOfAging)
5. Webinar: CMS's Coverage Decision: It's Not Just About Alzheimer's Disease
(Alliance for Aging Research)
6. Infectious Etiology of Alzheimer's Disease Workshop - Day 2
(National Institute on Aging)

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